Blogs

Posted on Friday 16th August 2019 at 7:30pm

Robust national survey data paints a revealing picture of the people behind the current push to legislate “religious freedoms”, and the politicians who are helping them. But electorate winds have recently changed.

In Part I and Part II of this series profiling the campaign for religious freedom in Australia, we explored the predominance of self-referential control amongst religious conservatives, who comprise a small minority (8%) of adult Australians. We also noted the recent collapse of religious faith, with a majority of Australians (54%) now reporting “no religion”.


In this third part, we explore three broad reasons why there’s relatively high support for “religious freedom” amongst federal politicians, even as citizen secularism surges.

The first reason is that our federal politicians are indeed on average more religious than the general population.


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Posted on Friday 16th August 2019 at 7:15pm

Robust national survey data paints a revealing picture of the people behind the current push to legislate “religious freedoms”, and the politicians who are helping them. But electorate winds have recently changed.

In Part I we employed robust national survey data from Australian National University (ANU) to establish that in public attitudes toward four social law reforms — abortion, voluntary assisted dying, marijuana use, and marriage equality — opposition was uniquely high amongst only one psychographic Australian Social Identity (ASI6) segment. That segment is religious conservatives, who comprise a small minority (8%) of the adult population.

While it’s important to remember that each of these characteristics alone doesn’t describe every religious conservative — for example, 15% don’t oppose marriage equality — the ANU data uncovers many other characteristics that are also far more prevalent amongst religious conservatives than others.

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Posted on Friday 16th August 2019 at 7:00pm

Robust national survey data paints a revealing picture of the people behind the current push to legislate “religious freedoms”, and the politicians who are helping them. But electorate winds have recently changed.

Robust national survey data paints a revealing picture of the people behind the current push to legislate “religious freedoms”, and the politicians who are helping them. But electorate winds have recently changed.

In political reaction to Australia’s legalisation of marriage equality in 2017, the federal government is about to introduce its “religious freedoms” bill into parliament. But the marriage equality reform explains only a small part of the picture, as robust evidence reveals.

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Posted on Tuesday 12th February 2019 at 4:00pm

Entrepreneurial start-ups consider market research less than do corporates and medium enterprises. We discuss why, and what value economical research can bring to a new venture.

Major corporates and medium enterprises are generally well-versed in the powerful benefits that market research brings to decision making. Entrepreneurs, especially those in the start-up or early growth phase, are less likely to consider market research. Why is that?

New ROI scaling

For smaller ventures it’s quite understandable: you’re not going to spend your entire to-market budget, or a great majority of it, on research. It makes more sense to get your product to market and see if it’s a goer or not.

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Posted on Wednesday 16th January 2019 at 10:00pm

Sometime it's necessary to offer potential respondents an incentive to participate in a survey. There's ample opportunity to unnecessarily increase research costs and decrease response rates if you don't know what you're doing.

In a busy world with numerous and often competing requests for potential survey respondents’ attention and time, researchers sometimes have to draw on additional skills and resources to garner the requisite number of respondents.

One of the methods for increasing the participation rate is to offer potential respondents an incentive of some kind as a motivation or compensation for their time and effort.

Some studies won't require a respondent incentive, while others won't succeed without one.

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Posted on Tuesday 20th November 2018 at 3:00pm

The final report of ResearchSquirrel's major study into law and order in Victoria was released today. Coalition and Labor performance was compared, with one side coming out in front.

The final report of ResearchSquirrel's major study into law and order in Victoria was released today, ahead of the state election. Coalition and Labor performance was compared, with one side coming out in front.

Get the full report PDF

Executive summary

As Victorians head to the polls on November 24th, a key topic on voters’ minds is law and order. It’s been found to be potentially the most important issue of the election.

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Posted on Saturday 21st July 2018 at 10:40pm

Some researchers, even experienced ones, refer to some forms of survey results as “unprompted”. We argue not only that there’s no such thing, but that thinking “unprompted” is a dangerous and biased pastime.

We repeatedly hear researchers refer to statistical survey results as “unprompted”. Sadly, it’s an oxymoron that can only serve to impoverish, if not seriously misguide and bias, the insights to be gained from the survey.

“Prompted versus unprompted” response language even turns up in peer-reviewed research papers, along with the gibberish of supposed “unprompted questions” in marketing textbooks. Oh dear. Can they even hear themselves talking?

At ResearchSquirrel we argue that “unprompted” language should be excised from the research lexicon. Here’s why.

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Posted on Sunday 29th October 2017 at 10:30pm

The Australian Government is conducting a $120m+ ‘polling’ exercise to determine if there is majority electorate support for marriage equality. But we already know the correct answer, and it’s a resounding Yes.

At a cost of more than $120 million, the Australian Government is ‘polling’ Australian voters to determine if a majority are in favour of legalising marriage equality. If the result of the poll is positive (over 50%), the Government says it will introduce a Bill to legalise marriage equality. However, MPs will be granted a ‘conscience’ vote: they will not be bound to honour the majority will of the electorate in any case.

The ‘polling’ is wholly different from the process adopted by Australia's federal parliament in 2004, when without consulting the electorate, it amended the Marriage Act to expressly ban same-sex marriage, including refusing to recognise those lawfully solemnised in other Commonwealth countries.

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Posted on Tuesday 12th July 2016 at 1:00am

Using a free generic questionnaire template for your survey is likely to yield very limited or possibly even misleading insights.

There are plenty of free, generic survey questionnaire templates online. I argue that they present a significant risk to entrepreneurs, business owners and professionals who are attempting to gain specific and meaningful insights.

It happens a little too often: the client who asks us to tweak a questionnaire template they've retrieved from... somewhere or other.

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Posted on Monday 13th June 2016 at 7:00pm

We critique a typical "expert-certified" free questionnaire template. The results are not pretty and your research will suffer if you use them.

For market research to be valuable, each step from the initial strategic plan, through design and fieldwork, and to analysis and final reporting needs to be accomplished to a professional standard using valid and relevant procedures and techniques. That includes questionnaire design.

Free questionnaire templates are offered online as pre-packaged 'solutions.' But as you might expect, you usually get what you pay for. In this article we comment on a real, free 'customer satisfaction survey' questionnaire template. The template is even classed as 'certified by a research expert.' We wonder how that is. As you will see, we identify many shortcomings that will result in underinformed, if not misinformed decision making.

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